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Social Studies

Three credits of Social Studies are required for students to graduate from CMASAS. To meet these requirements students must have one credit of World History, one credit of US History, 0.5 credit Economics, and 0.5 credit American Government or Civics.

 

Typical H.S. Social Studies Sequence:

  • World History - 10th grade
  • U.S. History - 11th grade
  • U.S. Government - 12th grade
  • Economics - 12th grade

While the above sequence is the most common, it is by no means the only path.

Meet with your counselor and PEC to discuss the sequence that will best meet your specific education and career goals.

Courses

African-American History

Over the course of U.S. history, how have African Americans helped shaped American culture? This African American History course answers that question by tracing the accomplishments and obstacles of African Americans beginning with the slave trade on up to the modern Civil Rights movement. What was it like during slavery, or after emancipation, or during the years of discrimination under Jim Crow? Who were some of the main figures who have shaped African American history?

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

Anthropology I

What makes us human? Is it our ability to use language? Is it our abstract thinking skills or our use of tools and technology? In Anthropology 1 you will trace the history of homo sapiens and explore our evolutionary trail. This course offers an anthropologic lens to observe our movement from cave dweller to modern human. It sheds light on how we forged our way and developed all of the things that make us human, such as our cultures, languages, and religions.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

Anthropology II

Find out how different locations shape various cultures and, in turn, how these cultures shape people’s lives around the world—from the jungles of the Amazon to the islands of Indonesia. Anthropology II provides a fascinating look at this puzzle of culture.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: Anthropology I

Archaeology

The field of archeology helps us to better understand the events and societies of the past that have helped to shape our modern world. This course focuses on these techniques, methods, and theories that guide the study of the past.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

Classical Philosophy

Honors, NCAA, Silver

Students will explore the definition of philosophy and will receive an overview of Classical approaches to the topic. They will read works by Plato and Aristotle and learn to create a philosophical argument free of logical fallacies. Students conclude the course by creating a statement of personal philosophy.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

Criminology

In this course, we will explore the field of criminology or the study of crime.  In doing so, we will look at possible explanations for crime from psychological, biological, and sociological standpoints, explore the various types of crime and their consequences for society, and investigate how crime and criminals are handled by the criminal justice system.  Why do some individuals commit crimes but others don’t?  What aspects in our culture and society promote crime and deviance?  Why do indi

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

Current World Issues & Politics

Honors, NCAA, Silver

With a strong emphasis in critical thinking skills, students explore current events. Topics include human rights, civic action and responsibility, environmental issues, globalization and the economy, politics and government, social problems both local and global, and other timely topics. Students learn about logic, and faulty logic, and how to analyze various media for engaging in propaganda and faulty logic.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing; Senior standing recommended; U.S. History and World History

Economics, Principles of

Honors, NCAA, Silver

Covers fundamental economic concepts, including micro- and macroeconomics, international economics, comparative economic systems, measurement, and methods. Emphasis is placed in recognizing cause-and-effect relationships, encouraging the development of critical thinking skills applied within the realm of economics.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: Senior standing recommended; Algebra I recommended

Great Minds in Science

Is there life on other planets? What extremes can the human body endure? Can we solve the problem of global warming? Today, scientists, explorers, and writers are working to answer all of these questions. Like Edison, Einstein, Curie, and Newton, the scientists of today are asking questions and working on problems that may revolutionize our lives and world. This course focuses on 10 of today’s greatest scientific minds.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

History of the Holocaust

Holocaust education requires a comprehensive study of not only times, dates, and places, but also the motivation and ideology that allowed these events.  In this course, students will study the history of anti-Semitism; the rise for the Nazi party; and the Holocaust, from its beginnings through liberation and the aftermath of the tragedy.  The study of the Holocaust is a multi disciplinary one, integrating world history, geography, American history, and civics. 

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

Human Geography

How do language, religion, and landscape affect the physical environment? How do geography, weather, and location affect customs and lifestyle? Students will explore the diverse ways in which people affect the world around them and how they are affected by their surroundings. Students will discover how ideas spread and cultures form, and learn how beliefs and architecture are part of a larger culture complex.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

Personal Psychology I

In Personal Psychology I you will trace the development of personality and behavior from infancy through adulthood. You will come to learn more about perception and consciousness and better understand the role of sensation. Are you ready to explore the world of human behavior? Come explore all that psychology can offer to help you to truly understand the human experience.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

Personal Psychology II

In Personal Psychology II will you to explore what makes you ‘you’. Why do some things motivate you more than others? How can you determine your IQ? If you’ve ever wanted to dive right into the depths of who you are and how you got to be you, jump on board and start your exploration now!

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: Personal Psychology I

Philosophy, Introduction to

Go on an exciting adventure covering over 2,500 years of history! Along the way, you’ll run into some very strange characters, like the dirty barefoot man who hung out on street corners pestering everyone with questions, or that eccentric fellow who climbed inside a stove to think about whether he existed.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

Psychology, Introduction

Honors, NCAA, Silver

Understanding the thoughts, emotions and behaviors of self and others is critical to developing and maintaining interpersonal relationships. In Psychology I, students learn theories of historically significant psychologists who laid the foundation for scientific research and a clearer understanding of the human mind. This course explores how psychological perspectives influence personality and play a role in human development across the lifespan.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

Social Problems I

Social Problems I will explore some of the biggest challenges facing our world today and prepare you to tackle them head-on. You’ll learn what led to these social problems, what effects they have on our lives and societies, and what possible solutions exist for solving them. Whether you want to save the world from the next pandemic or better understand the effects of the media on society, this course will help you develop a plan of action.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

Social Problems II

In Social Problems II you’ll explore more of the challenges we face and learn what we can do to reduce the effects of these conflicts and problems. From drug abuse to terrorists to the changing nature of communities in our digital world, we can better face and solve these problems when we have a deeper understanding of their causes and influences on our lives.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: Social Problems I

Sociology I

In this increasingly connected world, students will examine problems in our society and learn how human relationships can influence the life of the student.  Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the world are also presented in the course. 

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

Sociology II

Sociology II takes a powerful look at how social institutions like families, religion, government, and education shape our world and how collective behavior and social movements can create change. Although the reality of the battles isn’t always pretty, gaining a clearer picture of the different sides can help you better understand how our lives are shaped by entertainment, social institutions, and social change.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: Sociology I

Survey of Religion

Honors, Silver

Students survey major religions and belief systems in the world.  They also explore how religion is viewed in the United States, including the concepts of freedom of religion and the "separation of church and state." Students compare religions and look for purposes and common messages found across cultures and faiths.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

U.S. Government

Honors, NCAA, Silver

Students learn the history and current structure of the United States government, and how to be active participants in the U.S. political system. They gain understanding of the underlying philosophies that formed the current system, explore the concept of democracy and individual rights, review landmark court decisions, evaluate and take positions on key issues, and learn to think critically.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: Senior standing, or instructor permission; U.S. History recommended

U.S. History

Honors, NCAA, Silver

U.S. History follows a review of the nation’s beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment on U.S. democratic ideals. The course traces the change in the ethnic composition of American society. An emphasis is placed on the expanding role of the federal government and federal courts as well as the continuing tension between the individual and the state. Students examine that rights under the U.S.

Duration: 2 Semesters
Prerequisites: World History recommended; Junior or Senior standing recommended

Women’s Studies, Introduction

The Introduction to Women’s Studies focuses on the experience of women, but it’s appropriate for anyone who wants to learn to critically examine films while learning about the history of the women’s movement and how gender, race, and social class influence us. Women have earned their right to stand up and be recognized as equal partners and reap the benefits of their hard work. As the anonymous quote goes, “History is Herstory too.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None

World Religions

This course focuses on the major religions that have played a role in human history, including Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, and Taosim. Students will trace the major developments in these religions and explore their relationships with social institutions and culture. The course will also discuss some of the similarities and differences among the major religions and examine the connections and influences they have.

Duration: 1 Semester
Prerequisites: None